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The Power of Copy

"This chair was built for breaking things."

In writing, there is nothing like a strong refrain. It's why songs have choruses, right? The intention is to drive home a particular theme or point, with repetition. The goal for any writing stands: Make it simple and make it powerful. Yes, that includes brand and copywriting. Great, artful copy can be simple, beautiful, and effectively promote your brand while talking about something else, on the surface.

That is what BWM's ad featuring 4x Paralympian and World Champion wheelchair racer Josh George does. The ad, titled "Built For Gold", debuted during the 2016 Rio Olympic Games and ran throughout. Check it out below:

The copy is utterly poetic – actor Chris Pine's voice is grizzled and almost unrecognizable as the narrator, capturing a grit and toughness that is the spirit of the entire piece. The image of Josh George is already striking, leaning forward in his BMW-made chair, speeding down a cornfield-flanked road. To match that refrain, the ad gives the viewer an equally "simple yet compelling" visual. The seemingly endless road is the only location and George, hands on the push rims, is the only subject.

Outside of the repetition of the opening phrase, a beautiful nod to breaking athletic records and barriers, the rest of the copy calls upon the imagery of machinery and craftsmanship. The perfect word choice in the language serves as a way to blur the lines between engineering and anatomy. The words act as a bridge, common ground, between George's athletic power and BMW's expert engineering.

What is the point of the ad, though? Clearly, BWM is in the business of selling cars, so is that what this ad aims to do? Well, yes and no. There is also a concurrent lesson in using great copy to advertise your brand as something greater than its most known product. BWM, in this particular piece, highlights its services as a proud partner. It is in the writing that the ad finds a way to respectfully communicate the prowess of George and BMW, simultaneously. That is, after all, the goal of a marketing partnership.

"A tool designed by the world's best engineers."

Ah! There it is. Tastefully placed in the copy is a reference back to BMW and what they do. With this line, the car manufacturer is positioned as having the world's best engineers on their team, and all of a sudden it makes sense. With a poem, BWM is telling you that they matched the incredible will of an elite athlete with their own elite craftsmanship. And it is that same craftsmanship that goes into all that they create – including those cars that made them a premiere company.

"…to dismantle, destroy, and dominate. Driven by will of steel and destined to chase gold."

This ad serves as a great example of what great and poetic language can do for your brand, as well as the brand of your partner or any cause your company supports. It is beautiful and links ideas about power, skill, and craft to each of the entities involved. BMW rarely features advertising without their cars in it, but this is a welcome exception. And because of great copywriting (and an amazing racer!), they still get the point across that they specialize in drive and engineering. 

Whether you're a small business or a corporation like BMW, making sure you have the right people to tell your story in an ad could allow your brand to transcend the normal pitch. Great copy can even allow you the freedom to not overtly sell anything – and instead let your knowledge of your craft speak for itself. Of course – poetry doesn't hurt!

"...together we will have built something great.
The ultimate driving machine."


	
		
		

With the Rio Olympics now in the books, your good friends over here at GLAD WORKS are looking back at couple of our favorite advertising and branding moments surrounding the games. In a series we call "The Power of…", we'll breakdown what we see, using a marketer's eye.

The Power of Branding

If you kept up with the games like we did, or if you live on the planet Earth, you know that Usain Bolt is the fastest man on land! After completing the unprecedented Triple-Triple in his final Olympics, that just can't be disputed anymore. In regular person speak, that means he won a gold medal in the three main Sprinting events – the 100m, the 200m, and the 4x100 Relay – in three straight Olympics – 2008, 2012, and 2016. Yes, you read that correctly! Nine total gold medals over an eight-year period and World Record times in each event.

 

From a marketing perspective, every brand wants to avoid having their qualities misrepresented. Whether you are a small business facing a PR crisis or a powerful corporate giant perceived to be unapproachable, a bad image matters to any brand. There are countless public relations professionals in our industry who get paid a ton of money to avoid those types of negative stamps. In the age of social media, the Retweet, and the Share – a bad image can spread like wildfire and wildfire can devastate a brand.

For an athlete's brand, the "arrogant superstar" label is a nightmare. Usain Bolt didn't invent the cocky athlete persona, nor will he be the last one tagged with it. He has, however, taken it to a global level by showcasing it on the world's stage. Patriotism is expected but braggadocio from an Olympian could rub entire countries the wrong way. Bolt is well known for showboating, chest thumping, dancing, and celebrating — before his races are even over! Nobody likes a sore winner, especially if they win a lot.

Usain Bolt is phenomenally good at what he does and he knows it. It's easy to think that a guy like that is literally not human or relatable. Now, imagine if it was your job to do just that for his brand! Well, if you pride yourself on paying attention to great marketing like we do — you'll notice Gatorade did exactly that with "The Boy Who Learned To Fly". Check it out!

 

 

Warm and fuzzy feeling, right? We know! This ad is immediately colorful and charming. It's animated in the style of a children's storybook or those beloved shorts before Disney Pixar movies that we all love (admit it!). It frames Bolt's childhood in a way that is authentically Jamaican, yet universal and lovable!

Anyone who watches that ad is left feeling a little bit closer to Usain Bolt, which is a lot to be said for the fastest human being in Olympics history! More than that, it takes a quality that people may dislike about him and tells us why it serves as strength to help him be his best self. He shows us that he has struggled, that he gets scared, that he gets discouraged, and that he is ultimately just like an of us striving to achieve our goals.

That is what great branding does — it transforms arrogance into confidence, it turns cockiness into passion, and it can tell a story that explains excessive celebration as pure joy. With seven minutes of proper branding, Usain Bolt goes from a talented sore winner who taunts fellow competitors, to a true-life underdog who is simply fueled by the fun of competition. That is the power of great professional branding and true storytelling. That's not only something that we recognize and appreciate here at GLAD WORKS, but something that we do for our own clients — in whatever races they may be running!

Chime in and let us know what you think about the best ads from this year's Olympic Games! 


	
		
		

 

The Internet is ablaze with discussion over Nationwide Insurance Company's choice to air an ad titled "Make Safe Happen" during the Super Bowl. The ad features a little boy narrating all of the things he won't do because he "couldn't grow up" since he "died from an accident." This ad hits anyone with a pulse right in the chest. Many were outraged over the buzz kill during the Super Bowl—a time when most people would prefer to think about the Carl's Jr. girl or lost puppies.

For those of you who have only just now dug out from under a pile of snow and have not seen it yet, here it is for review before we go on:

The ad itself is very nicely done and both it and its message are beyond reproach. The question here is: did it belong in the Super Bowl ad lineup? Many people say "no way!" and took to social media to express their outrage. Some even vowed not to give Nationwide their business and got caught up in the angry mob that can sometimes start on social media.

We understand that their goal was not to sell insurance but rather to start an important conversation with the largest audience that they could purchase access to. In that, they succeeded. But we're not quite sure it was the conversation that they intended. 

Unfortunately, more people are talking about their distaste for the ad rather than the topic it was intended to inspire. So as a company, they succeeded in gaining national attention, but they failed to get people talking about fatal accidents in the home involving children.

The problem is that the audience was expecting to see something that's just for fun. Trying to deliver such an important message at that particular moment was bad timing. Sometimes it all comes down to knowing when an audience is going to be receptive to a message and when it's not. It's kind of like telling a joke at a funeral. Funny joke, inappropriate time, Aunt Bethany gives you the hairy eyeball and complains to your mother about you.

But Nationwide isn't the only company that chose to tug on heartstrings. Nissan chose "With Dad," an ad that follows a loving family as they grow up over the years, but features 20 seconds of the dad, who is a racecar driver, getting into a severe crash as the mom watches in horror on TV while her little boy plays with a toy race car under the coffee table. But "With Dad" ended with a happy reunion between father and son, driving off in a Nissan together. The emotional impact was big, but the difference is that it felt good in the end and so avoided negative attention. We've seen in the past that a Super Bowl audience is totally receptive to being taken on an emotional journey, just as long as it ends happily.

Social media can also heavily influence the way people react to things. This ad got so much negative attention on social media that the people who actually appreciated it were drowned out by the angry mob. As more people saw the negative comments, more people made negative comments and it snowballed quickly into "the thing that ruined the Super Bowl."

The biggest takeaway here is that timing is everything. Knowing when your audience is going to be most receptive to your message is key or else you could find yourself in a sticky situation. Ultimately, we all know that advertisers spend money to make money, regardless of any well-positioned public awareness campaign. So we'll have to see if the old saying rings true, that there's no such thing as bad press—the rise or fall of Nationwide's consumer numbers should tell that story in the months to come!

What was your reaction to the Nationwide ad, GLAD WORKS friends? 


	
		
		

 

Last week we introduced you to Google Grants, the nonprofit edition of AdWords, which are the text ads that appear on the right of your Google search page results. If you've read last week's post, then you have already determined if your nonprofit will qualify for Google Grants or not. If you do, congrats!  That is awesome news!  Now, you just need to know how to make good use of it.

 

Whether you are managing your campaign yourself or are working with an agency (like GLAD WORKS, shameless plug there, sorry) there are a few tips we can share with you to make sure you get everything you can out of your account.

Know what you want to do

This seems obvious, but honestly you need to do a lot of planning and have a carefully considered list of objectives. Running ads just for the heck of it is a waste. You need specific reasons and measurable goals. Some of your goals might be:

  • Draw attention to new content on your website like blog posts or videos
  • Get people to sign up for your email newsletters
  • Attract people to an event
  • Recruit more volunteers
  • Get more donations

Once you've got that part sorted out, you need to have realistic expectations. If your goal is to get people to come to your site and immediately sign up to volunteer or receive newsletters, you may be disappointed. But if they click on your ad, you've at least gotten them to your landing page. Don't be discouraged because they will come back as long as you have something awesome and impressive to come back to (like a well designed, user friendly site with great content).

Measuring your success

There are ways to measure your goals. Establish some baseline numbers and then experiment to see if they improve. If something's not working, mess with it a bit until you start seeing results that please you. It's possible through AdWords to see what is performing and there is no extra cost for changing your ads. Make sure AdWords is linked to Google Analytics so you can do this.

Think about your content carefully

You can either write your own content or have it done professionally (ahem, GLAD WORKS, ahem). Either way, it's important to take the time to word your ads carefully. Be sure that what you say goes along with your general messaging and that it's engaging to the reader so that it draws them in

Consider whom you're talking to

If you want folks to make that ever-important click, you need to say something that will interest them. You do this through keywords. AdWords campaigns are collected into groups. Each contains an assortment of ads. Each ad collection is triggered by a set of certain related keywords. Your keywords should be related to what your audience is searching for so that your ad comes up when they perform a search. For example, if you're looking for volunteers, you want that to be one of your keywords

Do your homework

If you're not sure what keywords to use, do a little research. Start googling stuff that you would google if you were looking for an organization like yours. In other words, think like your audience. Having great keywords are at the heart of success with AdWords.

Other ways to come up with good keywords include:

  • Checking into your Google Analytics for what keyword phrases folks have been searching for. Again, make sure that's hooked up to your AdWords so you can accomplish this.
  • Define "negative keywords."  These are words that might come up that are not relevant to you at all. For example you do not want someone to click on your ad who is looking for a job, then you would make the word "job" a negative keyword. If you were selling flutes then you would want to make "champagne" a negative keyword so you don't get folks who are shopping for champagne flutes. Every click counts so don't waste em' on the wrong audience!
  • If you only serve a specific region, make sure that's a keyword 

A good way to start

Take some of your existing copy and edit that to include your keywords. Then, you can tailor your message to communicate what you want people to know. Maybe you have a conference coming up or a new blog post to promote. Work that in. Whatever you do, make sure the ads you are promoting reflect the mission of your nonprofit. If you're selling something 100% of the proceeds must benefit your organization.

Ask for help

You are busy trying to run your organization and it ain't easy. You're pulled in a hundred different directions and you don't have a lot of time to sit and really figure this out. If that's the case, ask for some help. Consider partnering with an agency (Gee, if only we knew one who does this sort of thing…) and get the help you need to make it a success.


	
		
		

 

Yes, Google is taking over the world, but that doesn’t mean they don't have a heart. They have programs out there that are meant to help struggling nonprofits get their word out without having to spend any of their precious donations to do it. Today we will explain those programs, and their requirements, Hope you qualify and get to take advantage!  We'll talk about what to do with it next week. Let's just get you qualified first!

 

YouTube for non-profits

There exists a "YouTube for non-profits" feature that is a part of the Google Grants program. This is tied into Google Grants so once your organization is accepted, you'll be able to access the wonders and the glories that come with it. You will get:

  • Premium branding capabilities on YouTube channels
  • Increased uploading capacity
  • The ability to select custom thumbnail images
  • Call-to-action overlay on your videos

 From what we understand, the "non-profits" is a division of the YouTube partners program.

YouTube for non-profits (click that link so you can see what we are talking about) also allows for a "donate" button that can appear directly onto the video pages. It's important to note that you don't get any of these features unless you qualify for the program. It's not for everybody.

Google Grants

In summary, if your organization is accepted into the program, you will be given a daily budget of $330 a day, which works out to be $10,000 per month for free from Google AdWords. Pretty sweet, right? However, it seems that you can only bid up to $1.00 per click maximum as part of the program. There are certain eligibility requirements we will list below for your reference. Only one membership per organization is allowed and it is limited to text ads only. 

Here's some more information about the program taken directly from the Google Grants main page

Google Grants is the nonprofit edition of AdWords, Google's online advertising tool. Google Grants empowers nonprofit organizations, through $10,000 per month in in-kind AdWords™ advertising, to promote their missions and initiatives on Google.com.

About the Program

Google Grantees receive a grant for free AdWords advertising on Google.com. Grantees build and manage their own AdWords accounts just like paying advertisers, but participate with the following restrictions:

    •    A daily budget set to $330 USD, which is equivalent to about $10,000 per month

    •    A maximum cost-per-click (CPC) limit of $1.00 USD

    •    Only run keyword-targeted campaigns

    •    Only appear on Google.com

    •    Only run text ads

    •    Run for as long as the organization remains actively engaged with their  Grants AdWords account 

Eligibility

1) To be eligible for the Google for Nonprofits program, organizations must:

  • Hold current 501(c)3 status, as determined by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service; and acknowledge and agree to the application's required certifications regarding nondiscrimination and donation receipt and use.

2) Please note that the following organizations are not eligible for Google for Nonprofits:

  • Governmental entities and organizations;
  • Hospitals and health care organizations;
  • Schools, childcare centers, academic institutions, and universities (philanthropic arms of educational organizations are eligible). To learn more about Google's programs for educational institutions, visit Google in Education.

3) Google reserves the right to grant or deny an organization's application or participation at any time, for any reason, and to supplement or amend these eligibility guidelines at any time. Selections are made at Google's sole discretion, and are not subject to external review.

If you think your organization qualifies for Google grants AdWords for nonprofits, follow this link for application details.

Now that you're aware of what's out there, we can start to talk about ways to make the most of it once you're signed up and doin' your thang!  Your homework for the week is to see if you might be able to qualify and even get your application started. We'll help you along with the process so no worries.  We're with you every step of the way!


	
		
		

 

Yes, Google is taking over the world, but that doesn’t mean they don't have a heart. They have programs out there that are meant to help struggling nonprofits get their word out without having to spend any of their precious donations to do it. Today we will explain those programs, and their requirements, Hope you qualify and get to take advantage!  We'll talk about what to do with it next week. Let's just get you qualified first!

YouTube for non-profits

There exists a "YouTube for non-profits" feature that is a part of the Google Grants program. This is tied into Google Grants so once your organization is accepted, you'll be able to access the wonders and the glories that come with it. You will get:

  • Premium branding capabilities on YouTube channels
  • Increased uploading capacity
  • The ability to select custom thumbnail images
  • Call-to-action overlay on your videos

From what we understand, the "non-profits" is a division of the YouTube partners program.

YouTube for non-profits (click that link so you can see what we are talking about) also allows for a "donate" button that can appear directly onto the video pages. It's important to note that you don't get any of these features unless you qualify for the program. It's not for everybody.

Google Grants

In summary, if your organization is accepted into the program, you will be given a daily budget of $330 a day, which works out to be $10,000 per month for free from Google AdWords. Pretty sweet, right? However, it seems that you can only bid up to $1.00 per click maximum as part of the program. There are certain eligibility requirements we will list below for your reference. Only one membership per organization is allowed and it is limited to text ads only.

Here's some more information about the program taken directly from the Google Grants main page:

Google Grants is the nonprofit edition of AdWords, Google's online advertising tool. Google Grants empowers nonprofit organizations, through $10,000 per month in in-kind AdWords™ advertising, to promote their missions and initiatives on Google.com.

About the Program

Google Grantees receive a grant for free AdWords advertising on Google.com. Grantees build and manage their own AdWords accounts just like paying advertisers, but participate with the following restrictions:

    •    A daily budget set to $330 USD, which is equivalent to about $10,000 per month

    •    A maximum cost-per-click (CPC) limit of $1.00 USD

    •    Only run keyword-targeted campaigns

    •    Only appear on Google.com

    •    Only run text ads

    •    Run for as long as the organization remains actively engaged with their  Grants AdWords account

Eligibility

1) To be eligible for the Google for Nonprofits program, organizations must:

  • Hold current 501(c)3 status, as determined by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service; and acknowledge and agree to the application's required certifications regarding nondiscrimination and donation receipt and use.

2) Please note that the following organizations are not eligible for Google for Nonprofits:

  • Governmental entities and organizations;
  • Hospitals and health care organizations;
  • Schools, childcare centers, academic institutions, and universities (philanthropic arms of educational organizations are eligible). To learn more about Google's programs for educational institutions, visit Google in Education.

3) Google reserves the right to grant or deny an organization's application or participation at any time, for any reason, and to supplement or amend these eligibility guidelines at any time. Selections are made at Google's sole discretion, and are not subject to external review.

If you think your organization qualifies for Google grants AdWords for nonprofits, follow this link for application details.

Now that you're aware of what's out there, we can start to talk about ways to make the most of it once you're signed up and doin' your thang!  Your homework for the week is to see if you might be able to qualify and even get your application started. We'll help you along with the process so no worries.  We're with you every step of the way!


	
		
		

 

Today is going to be so much fun! We were having a meeting last week when the conversation came around to awesome television commercials. Everyone had some great ones to share with some really interesting insight as to why each particular commercial works so well. When advertising is done properly, it has incredible power. We can go on journeys, we laugh, we cry, we feel motivated to do our taxes…

Here are our favorites right now along with some cool thoughts from your favorite GLAD WORKS team members!

Gina:

I absolutely love this one for TurboTax. The copywriting in “The Year of the You” is sheer genius in the way that it transforms the act of doing your taxes, which everyone hates, into a reflection on the story of your year. A boring task is turned into an opportunity to report on your year your way rather than having someone else put the pieces together for you. It actually makes me want to do my taxes. It makes it even seem like fun. That’s powerful stuff right there!

The next one I love is “They Lived” by Subaru. I cry every single time I see it even though it’s very simple. Seeing twisted and mangled cars being towed and hauled away paired with the simple words “they lived” hits me in the gut every single time. Subaru has a reputation for making safe cars, and the tag line at the end, “Love it’s what makes a Subaru, a Subaru” adds that extra bit of impact and drives (no pun intended) their point home beautifully. The ability to protect the ones you love is one more thing to add to that list of what makes a Subaru a Subaru. Awesome.

Brittany:

Remember the moonwalking pony ads everyone was going crazy for a while back? Three, a British mobile phone network, is at it again with “Sing it Kitty.” The ad features a cute little girl and her kitty riding through town on a bike, rocking out to We Built This City by Starship. The two friends are sharing a fun moment and while you’re watching it, you can’t help but smile and think of whom you’ll share the ad with (I shared it with a friend who has a daughter the same age as the little girl in the commercial). 

But what does this have to do with mobile networks? It’s all about sharing and that magical moment that happens when you share something silly with another person. As the ad says at the end, “we all need silly stuff.”  And sharing silly stuff is an awesome way to make a connection with someone.

Piero:

I always enjoy the Allstate commercials because they’re funny and fun to watch. They do lots of unexpected things and I think the silliness of the commercials draws away from the stiff corporate image that plagues insurance companies. Why can’t insurance be fun?  Everyone needs it, we can’t escape it, so why not poke a little fun at life’s little incidents?

 

Matt:

I’ve always been a fan of the Travelocity Travel Gnome commercials. The gnome is iconic to the brand and the commercials usually have a fair amount of wit to make them memorable. Any way that an ad can conjure up some sort of emotion in the viewer is a great way to make sure it’s not soon forgotten.

Adam:

The BMW missed opportunities ad is my current favorite because it speaks to me on many levels. I roll on the floor with laugher every time the guy says “140 characters?  I just don’t get it.”

It also resonates with me because I’m constantly chasing and seizing opportunities. When I see a good thing, I know it right away and I never let it go, unlike the poor sap in the commercial!  I think this ad targets it’s demographic perfectly.

Melyssa:

I am a bit obsessed with the Sprint “Framily Portrait” commercials. They’re entertaining to watch and each one tells the story of a diverse network of people called a “framily” who stay connected to one another through Sprint’s Framily plan. I love the way the ads are shot in a way that engages the viewer and gets the point across with very little copy. Images can at times express far more than words can and this advertisement proves it quite beautifully.

Kristen:

Okay so this one is a bit of a tearjerker, but that’s why I love it. Like what Matt said, any time you can get the viewer to experience an emotion, it’s a good thing!  Unlike the Allstate commercials that Piero loves, this Thai Life Insurance Company “Unsung Hero” ad goes straight to the heart. It makes you think about what’s important in life and why your own life is important.

The ad asks a simple question: “why do some people have plenty of money but no joy?” It then follows a young man who goes about his community performing random acts of kindness, finding joy in helping others. The man witnesses the happiness he brings, feels love and gets things money can’t buy from a life lived making the world a better place. Just get the tissues ready. What happens to the little girl will do you in.

What are some of your favorite television ads right now, GLAD WORKS friends?

Tell us in the comments!


	
		
		

 

Greetings GLAD WORKS friends!  We’ve been doing so many heavy posts about very serious things that we thought we should lighten things up a little bit. After all, it’s almost summer time and the livin’s easy! Today, we have some really fun videos for you as we’ve chosen four of our favorite viral ads to share. They all have a few things in common that we think greatly contribute to their virality. Can you guess what those elements might be?

No skipping to the end to find out the answer!

Carlsberg- Standing Up For a Friend

One of the world’s leading brands of beer has a fantastic online campaign called “Carlsberg puts friendship to the test.”  In this video, a group of volunteers are placed in a very dramatic scenario and asked to call their best friend to bail them out. Which friends will show up in the middle of the night in a seedy neighborhood and which ones will hang up the phone and go back to sleep?  You’ll have to watch the video to find out who stands up for their friend and enjoys a moment that “calls for a Carlsberg” in the end.

Kmart ‘Ship My Pants’ and ‘Big Gas Savings’

Nothing makes folks blush and/or laugh more than an ad with perfectly innocent words that when said together sound naughty. That’s exactly what Kmart has done and to great effect!  Some people may think these ads cross the line into inappropriateness, but we think it’s great that there’s a bit of controversy. After all, it’s got people talking about Kmart. When was the last time you talked about Kmart?  They have a bit of a fuddy-duddy reputation, but this campaign boosts their hip factor a bunch!  We dare you not to laugh when the man at the end ships his bed!

Spock vs. Spock!  Leonard Nimoy vs. Zachary Quinto: The Challenge

This ad was perfectly timed to coincide with the release of Star Trek Into Darkness. Audi clearly knows how to make a successful video and if they continue to make ads like this one, they’ll certainly live long and prosper (Sorry. We couldn’t help it!). In this online commercial, Audi pits the two Dr. Spocks against each other in a car race to the golf course. The loser buys lunch, but sadly, Nimoy’s car doesn’t seem to be up to par with Quinto’s Audi, and Quinto beats him to the club. Will Nimoy get the last laugh?  There’s a surprise ending you’re going to love!

It’s often said that there’s no formula for a viral video, but we think there are a few things that help increase your chances big time. Your video needs to be topical, it needs to have some element of surprise, it should evoke an emotional response, and it should be short and sweet. All of the videos we talked about today have those elements in place and that’s a big part of their success.

Have you seen any online “commercials” or viral ads that you thought were really effective?  Don’t be shy, share!


	
		
		

 

 

Recently, Twitter rolled out a new effort to build up their advertising business. Now you can purchase ads that will reach users based on the keywords in their recent tweets as well as the tweets they’ve interacted with recently. Today we’re going to go into some detail about this new feature and talk about how useful it might be to you. 

In other words, we’re going to tell you why you care.

We might also talk about ice cream because it’s May now and summer is coming!

What is keyword targeting?

Keyword targeting is a way for brands to show ads to users based on specific words in their tweets as well as words in tweets they’ve interacted with recently. In this way, people can be targeted based on things they’ve already said they’re interested in. As Twitter explains it, marketers can “reach users at the right moment in the right context” instead of trying to reach them on the basis of geographic location or demographic information.  

This does not mean you’ll see more ads on Twitter

Twitter promises us that this won’t mean that every time we tweet something we’ll see an ad for something related to it.  It just means that we’ll see more stuff related to things we actually care about. We’ll still be able to ignore Promoted Tweets, but we might not be as likely to ignore things since the ones we see will be more relevant to us. And indeed that is the hope behind these changes. Twitter hopes that this new feature will make people a lot more likely to engage with Promoted Tweets.

And this is why you care: people who are already interested in what you’re saying will see your tweets.

Pretty freakin’ sweet, right?

Speaking of sweet…

How it works

Twitter uses the example of advertising concert tickets to explain how this all works, but we’re going to talk about it in language that more of us can understand and appreciate: ice cream.

So let’s pretend that a user tweets about totally digging red velvet cake, and it so happens that YOU just added that flavor to your ice cream menu. You can run a geotargeted ad campaign using the keywords “red velvet cake” with a tweet that links to your ice cream shop’s website. That tweeter, having expressed an interest in red velvet cake, will now become aware of the glory and the wonder that is your newest flavor— red velvet cake ice cream. And it’s all because of this keyword targeting business.

How to do it

Setting up a targeted keyword campaign is easy peasy. First, you do your research and come up with the keywords you’d like to use (in our example that might be “red velvet cake,” “red velvet cake ice cream,” etc.). Choose whether you want to use phrase match or unordered keyword match. Next, you pick from other targeting options like geographic location, gender, and type of device. Your promoted tweets will then appear in user’s timelines when they mention any of your keywords or interact with other people’s posts that contain them.

It’ll be interesting to see how this takes off, but we think it sounds like it’s going to work really well. Folks who have already tried it are giving good reports, but we’d like to hear from any of you who’ve given it a whirl.

How did it work for you and would you do it again?


	
		
		

 

So, you’ve read our post about Google AdWords and Facebook Ads and you’ve decided to go with advertising on Facebook. But now what?  They have so many products!  There are Promoted Posts, Sponsored Stories, Page Post Ads and Marketplace Ads, but what do all these things do?  It’s overwhelming!

Not to worry, GLAD WORKS friends. We can sort this out for you.

Let’s dig in and take a look at Promoted Posts and Sponsored Stories—the two things we think you’re most likely to be interested in to start out with. 

Promoted Posts

A year ago this May, Facebook rolled out Promoted Posts, which gives businesses a chance to pay to get their content in front of more eyeballs. Since only a very limited percentage of your page’s followers actually see your posts come up in their news feeds, using Promoted Posts makes sense if you’ve got something you really want people to see.

The cost to promote a post varies based on your geographic location and the number of people you’re reaching, but you can spend anywhere from $10 up to $100 to make the magic happen. If any of your followers interact with your post (by sharing, liking, or commenting), a higher percentage of their friends will also see it. 

Promoted Posts show up exclusively in news feeds and you can purchase them right there on the post. Just look for the “Promote” option at the bottom right hand corner of each post. You’ll have a few options for how much you want to spend as well as an estimate of how many people will see your post. 

Sponsored Story

Another way to get your content in front of more Facebookers is to use Sponsored Stories. Sponsored Stories are built around user activity. As an advertiser, you pay to highlight an action that users have already taken. That action appears to the user’s friends either on the sidebar or in their news feed. An audience that’s not connected to a brand page themselves or through a friend will not see a Sponsored Story. 

The goal of a Sponsored Story is to get more users to take the same action that a friend has taken. So, if for example someone Likes a page, the Sponsored Story will appear either in the news feed or sidebar of that person’s friends, hoping to inspire them to follow suit. Think of it as being like “word of mouth” advertising. 

There are different kinds of Sponsored Stories:

  • Page Like Sponsored Stories appear when a user has liked a page
  • Offer Claimed Sponsored Stories appear when users have claimed an offer
  • Sweepstakes Sponsored Stories show up when someone has entered a sweepstakes.

You can purchase most Sponsored Stories through Facebook’s self-serve ad tool. 

Which is right for you?

Well, that depends on your goal. If your goal is to remind your existing fans that you’re still alive and kicking, or to spread the word about something awesome you feel the world needs to know about, Promoted Posts are a fantastic way to do that. You have to have more than 400 likes on your page in order to use the Promoted Posts option. 

Sponsored Stories can help you grow likes on your page, but it can also help you when you’re running a promotion on your website or hosting an event. For example, if a user signs up to go to an event you’re hosting, that story will appear to their friend who will hopefully say “Oh! That sounds like fun! I want to go too!”

It’s tough to say which one is right for you since every audience is different and the answer isn’t so clear-cut. It might make sense to dip your toe in the water a little bit and go with a Promoted Post first. If you don’t have enough followers, then a sponsored story might be the way to go toward getting your message out while giving you a chance to attract more likes to your page.

Whichever you choose, be sure to use it strategically and then track your results. Not everything is going to work for every audience, so keep testing to be sure you’re not wasting your time, money and effort on something that’s getting you mediocre results.